Thursday, June 26th, 2014

Minister reviews cane toad strategy

Environment minister Albert Jacob announced a review of the WA Government’s cane toad strategy.

Toadstuckonfence

A cane toad prevented from reaching water by a barrier fence. The government will not fund this method.

“With cane toads now appearing throughout the east Kimberley, the focus for the next five years is on preventing the establishment of new satellite populations and managing the impact of cane toads on native wildlife,” Mr Jacob said.

“A number of proposals, such as the use of parasitic lungworms to reduce cane toad populations and fencing to exclude cane toads from important sites, have been investigated and found not to be viable long-term management options.”

You can read his statement here:

 

 

Government of Western Australia

Department of the Premier and Cabinet

 

 

 

 

 

Hon Albert Jacob MLA

 

26/6/14

 

 

Minister for Environment

 

 

MEDIA STATEMENT

State cane toad strategy updated

 

• Updated cane toad strategy for WA

• New strategy based on results of ongoing research

 

An updated cane toad strategy for Western Australia has been released following a review of the first five years of the existing strategy’s operation.

 

Environment Minister Albert Jacob said the Cane Toad Strategy for Western Australia 2014-2019 reflected progress in the implementation of the original 10-year strategy.

 

“With cane toads now appearing throughout the east Kimberley, the focus for the next five years is on preventing the establishment of new satellite populations and managing the impact of cane toads on native wildlife,” Mr Jacob said.

 

“We have refocused the aims and objectives of the strategy based on the results of ongoing research and the current status of cane toads in WA.

 

“It means that the best available information is being used to inform the State’s management of cane toads.”

 

The Minister said the revised strategy would complement initiatives under the State Government’s $81.5million Kimberley Science and Conservation Strategy.

 

“This integrated approach will allow for more effective action to be taken,” he said.

 

“For example, cane toad management as part of Aboriginal land management programs under the strategy is being expanded to include the Kimberley islands, so that action can be taken to protect the diversity of plants and animals on the islands.”

 

Some of the actions from the original strategy are working well and have been retained in the new action plan, while others have been modified and some were completed in the first five years.

 

“A number of proposals, such as the use of parasitic lungworms to reduce cane toad populations and fencing to exclude cane toads from important sites, have been investigated and found not to be viable long-term management options,” Mr Jacob said.

 

Fact File

• Strategy available at http://www.dpaw.wa.gov.au/plants-and-animals/animals/cane-toads

• Cane toads crossed the Northern Territory-WA border in February 2009

• State Government has invested more than $8million since 2007 in the fight against cane toads

• Strategy will be reviewed and updated as new information comes to hand

 

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